djquietstorm:

Damn, would you look at these images. The colors and the textures, the depth and the detail! Just look at the surface of our spinning planet when shot this way, I’ve never seen earth captured this way…wait, has anyone? It’s not often that someone comes up with a completely new and different way of seeing the planet earth. 
Consider how we interpret the concentric circles of the star-trails.  Without question those circular streaks in the sky that are all centered perfectly on the exact same point in space, we see them as “stars”. We see them in a photo and they register to our minds as stars. But to someone from a time before the camera was invented they would not bear any resemblance to what the stars in the sky looked like. Stars are tiny points scattered over the sky, not lines! Not perfect circles stacked inside one another!
I have a feeling that Earth’s new face, this rich, subtle, colorful, tactile, detailed yet minimal, abstract and unique image which I’m seeing for the first time in my life right now and if I hadn’t been told it was a photo of our planet I would have had no idea what it was, I think this image is captivating enough to stay with us and eventually be recognizable to anyone as one of the ways that our planet looks like, in the same way that star-trails are a part of our visual knowledge now.
So there will be a day when the question will seem silly to even ask, when anyone sees the above image they will not even have to stop to think about it, they will see those colors and those trippy layers and see earth.
 ” Don Pettit, a flight engineer at the International Space Station, used one super-long exposure to create these amazing images of star trails. “
(via thedailyfeed)
djquietstorm:

Damn, would you look at these images. The colors and the textures, the depth and the detail! Just look at the surface of our spinning planet when shot this way, I’ve never seen earth captured this way…wait, has anyone? It’s not often that someone comes up with a completely new and different way of seeing the planet earth. 
Consider how we interpret the concentric circles of the star-trails.  Without question those circular streaks in the sky that are all centered perfectly on the exact same point in space, we see them as “stars”. We see them in a photo and they register to our minds as stars. But to someone from a time before the camera was invented they would not bear any resemblance to what the stars in the sky looked like. Stars are tiny points scattered over the sky, not lines! Not perfect circles stacked inside one another!
I have a feeling that Earth’s new face, this rich, subtle, colorful, tactile, detailed yet minimal, abstract and unique image which I’m seeing for the first time in my life right now and if I hadn’t been told it was a photo of our planet I would have had no idea what it was, I think this image is captivating enough to stay with us and eventually be recognizable to anyone as one of the ways that our planet looks like, in the same way that star-trails are a part of our visual knowledge now.
So there will be a day when the question will seem silly to even ask, when anyone sees the above image they will not even have to stop to think about it, they will see those colors and those trippy layers and see earth.
 ” Don Pettit, a flight engineer at the International Space Station, used one super-long exposure to create these amazing images of star trails. “
(via thedailyfeed)
djquietstorm:

Damn, would you look at these images. The colors and the textures, the depth and the detail! Just look at the surface of our spinning planet when shot this way, I’ve never seen earth captured this way…wait, has anyone? It’s not often that someone comes up with a completely new and different way of seeing the planet earth. 
Consider how we interpret the concentric circles of the star-trails.  Without question those circular streaks in the sky that are all centered perfectly on the exact same point in space, we see them as “stars”. We see them in a photo and they register to our minds as stars. But to someone from a time before the camera was invented they would not bear any resemblance to what the stars in the sky looked like. Stars are tiny points scattered over the sky, not lines! Not perfect circles stacked inside one another!
I have a feeling that Earth’s new face, this rich, subtle, colorful, tactile, detailed yet minimal, abstract and unique image which I’m seeing for the first time in my life right now and if I hadn’t been told it was a photo of our planet I would have had no idea what it was, I think this image is captivating enough to stay with us and eventually be recognizable to anyone as one of the ways that our planet looks like, in the same way that star-trails are a part of our visual knowledge now.
So there will be a day when the question will seem silly to even ask, when anyone sees the above image they will not even have to stop to think about it, they will see those colors and those trippy layers and see earth.
 ” Don Pettit, a flight engineer at the International Space Station, used one super-long exposure to create these amazing images of star trails. “
(via thedailyfeed)
djquietstorm:

Damn, would you look at these images. The colors and the textures, the depth and the detail! Just look at the surface of our spinning planet when shot this way, I’ve never seen earth captured this way…wait, has anyone? It’s not often that someone comes up with a completely new and different way of seeing the planet earth. 
Consider how we interpret the concentric circles of the star-trails.  Without question those circular streaks in the sky that are all centered perfectly on the exact same point in space, we see them as “stars”. We see them in a photo and they register to our minds as stars. But to someone from a time before the camera was invented they would not bear any resemblance to what the stars in the sky looked like. Stars are tiny points scattered over the sky, not lines! Not perfect circles stacked inside one another!
I have a feeling that Earth’s new face, this rich, subtle, colorful, tactile, detailed yet minimal, abstract and unique image which I’m seeing for the first time in my life right now and if I hadn’t been told it was a photo of our planet I would have had no idea what it was, I think this image is captivating enough to stay with us and eventually be recognizable to anyone as one of the ways that our planet looks like, in the same way that star-trails are a part of our visual knowledge now.
So there will be a day when the question will seem silly to even ask, when anyone sees the above image they will not even have to stop to think about it, they will see those colors and those trippy layers and see earth.
 ” Don Pettit, a flight engineer at the International Space Station, used one super-long exposure to create these amazing images of star trails. “
(via thedailyfeed)

djquietstorm:

Damn, would you look at these images. The colors and the textures, the depth and the detail! Just look at the surface of our spinning planet when shot this way, I’ve never seen earth captured this way…wait, has anyone? It’s not often that someone comes up with a completely new and different way of seeing the planet earth.

Consider how we interpret the concentric circles of the star-trails.  Without question those circular streaks in the sky that are all centered perfectly on the exact same point in space, we see them as “stars”. We see them in a photo and they register to our minds as stars. But to someone from a time before the camera was invented they would not bear any resemblance to what the stars in the sky looked like. Stars are tiny points scattered over the sky, not lines! Not perfect circles stacked inside one another!

I have a feeling that Earth’s new face, this rich, subtle, colorful, tactile, detailed yet minimal, abstract and unique image which I’m seeing for the first time in my life right now and if I hadn’t been told it was a photo of our planet I would have had no idea what it was, I think this image is captivating enough to stay with us and eventually be recognizable to anyone as one of the ways that our planet looks like, in the same way that star-trails are a part of our visual knowledge now.

So there will be a day when the question will seem silly to even ask, when anyone sees the above image they will not even have to stop to think about it, they will see those colors and those trippy layers and see earth.

” Don Pettit, a flight engineer at the International Space Station, used one super-long exposure to create these amazing images of star trails. “

(via thedailyfeed)

(via baxim)